1934 $500 Federal Reserve Notes (PMG Very Fine 35) - Silver.com™
Gold: $1810.39 2.20
Silver: $24.88 0.10
0

1934 $500 Federal Reserve Notes (PMG Very Fine 35)

Sell to Us Price: Call Us

Call us at 1-866-898-4805 or email us at buybacks@silver.com to receive custom bid pricing for this item. Note that buybacks are subject to $1,000 minimums as well as possible maximums depending on inventory positions, and require verbal confirmation via phone.

The Federal Reserve Note Series is the current and only form of paper money printed and circulated in the United States. The Federal Reserve Notes debuted in two major series released four years apart. In 1914, the common denominations still available to this day were introduced. In 1918, four denominations were introduced that would end up being used largely in bank-to-bank transactions. Right now, 1934 $500 Federal Reserve Notes in certified condition are available to purchase online at Silver.com.

Note Highlights:

  • Ships to you in PMG protective plastic sleeves!
  • Introduced in 1934!
  • Removed from circulation in 1969!
  • Bears a face value of $500 (USD) backed by the federal government.
  • Issued a Grade of Very Fine 35 by the Paper Money Guaranty.
  • The obverse features an effigy of President William McKinley.
  • On the reverse is the denomination of the note.
  • Please note you may get bills with the same district seals from the Federal Reserve when you buy more than one.

Each of the 1934 $500 Federal Reserve Notes available in this listing comes with a protective plastic sleeve from the PMG. The notes have been issued a Very Fine 35 grade by the PMG, indicating very light signs of handling with only four to seven folds. Compared to other notes of this grade range, notes with a VF35 grade have only light fold lines present.

Federal Reserve Notes come with District Seals on the obverse side. These seals use a one-letter, one-number combination to identify each of the 12 branch banks of the Federal Reserve. You will find that the notes in this listing could boast matching or varied District Seals if you buy more than one. These seals identify branch banks such as Minneapolis, Atlanta, New York City, and San Francisco.

The obverse of 1934 $500 Federal Reserve Notes features a portrait of President William McKinley. This effigy of President McKinley came to the obverse of the $500 note in the 1934 Series redesign, replacing the original portrait of John Marshall. President McKinley was a decorated war veteran and the last US President to have served in the US Civil War. McKinley easily won election in 1896 and again in 1900, but was assassinated in office in September 1901, just months into his second term in office.

On the reverse side of 1934 $500 Federal Reserve Notes is a depiction of the denomination of the note. The original $500 Federal Reserve Note offered a detailed vignette, while the 1934 Series redesign introduced a simpler design element with only the denomination and the nation of issue noted on the bills.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask. Silver.com customer service is available at 888-989-7223, online using our live chat, and via our email address.

Additional information

Weight 1.00000 oz

  1. There is currently no reviews for this product.

Mint Mark:  Not Shown

Condition:  Very Fine

Face Value:  $500 USD

Country:  United States

Edge Design:  Smooth

Packaging Type: Archival Quality Currency Sleeve

Images shown are examples only. Actual item appearance is subject to change, but will always correlate with title and description.

Lowest Price: $2349

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does shipping cost?

When will I receive my order?

How will my order be packaged?

From where will my order ship?

What if my order is lost or stolen in transit?

What payment methods do you accept?

Is my information secure?

How can I contact you?

Do you charge sales tax?

Where does your spot price come from?

Are your products actually in stock?

Why are multiple prices listed?

When do I lock in my price?

Do you ship internationally?